MD Anderson Cancer Center UTHealth
Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

11 Graduate School faculty members awarded over $11 million from CPRIT

February 22, 2019
Tracey Barnett

Eleven faculty members from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center UTHealth Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences were awarded funding from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT).

CPRIT awards to the Graduate School include:

Richard R. Bouchard, Ph.D., was awarded $895,907 for his project, Neoadjuvant treatment response monitoring of breast cancer with molecular photoacoustic imaging. Bouchard is affiliated with the GSBS Program in Medical Physics and is an assistant professor in the Department of Imaging Physics at MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Simona Colla, Ph.D., was awarded $900,000 for her project, Targeting hypomethylating resistance in myelodysplastic syndromes. Colla is affiliated with the GSBS Program in Cancer Biology and is an associate professor in the Department of Leukemia at MD Anderson.

Michael A. Curran, Ph.D., was awarded $900,000 for his project, Deciphering the underlying biology and translational relevance of PD-L2.  Curran is affiliated with the GSBS Program in Immunology and an associate professor in the Department of Immunology at MD Anderson.

Albert C. Koong, M.D., Ph.D., was awarded $900,000 for his project, Pharmacological targeting of the IRE1/XBP1 pathway for triple-negative breast cancer therapy. Koong became a GSBS faculty member in June 2018 and is a professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at MD Anderson.

Sue-Hwa Lin, Ph.D., was awarded $900,000 for her project, A novel therapy targeting prostate cancer-induced aberrant bone formation. Lin is affiliated with the GSBS Program in Cancer Biology and a professor in the Department of Translational Molecular Pathology at MD Anderson.

Li Ma, Ph.D., was awarded $900,000 for her project, The EZH2 deubiquitinase ZRANB1 as a therapeutic target in breast cancer. Ma is affiliated with the GSBS Programs in Cancer Biology and Genetics and Epigenetics, and is an associate professor in the Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology at MD Anderson.

Roza Nurieva, Ph.D., was awarded $900,000 for her project, Therapeutic potential of T-follicular helper cells for melanoma treatment. Nurieva is affiliated with the GSBS Program in Immunology and is an associate professor in the Department of Immunology at MD Anderson.

Mark D. Pagel, Ph.D., was awarded $886,927 for his project, Assessments of tumor perfusion with dynamic contract-enhanced multi-spectral optoacoustic tomography. Pagel is affiliated with the GSBS Program in Medical Physics and a professor in the Department of Cancer Systems Imaging at MD Anderson.

Keri L. Schadler, Ph.D., was awarded $899,922 for her project, Role of S1PR1 in exercise-induced tumor vascular remodeling. Schadler is affiliated with the GSBS Program in Cancer Biology and is an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics Research at MD Anderson. She is also a Graduate School alumna and obtained her Ph.D. in 2010. Her advisor was Eugenie S. Kleinerman, M.D.

Eva M. Sevick, Ph.D., was awarded $900,000 for her project titled Lymphatic delivery of checkpoint blockade inhibitors for more effective immunotherapy. Sevick is affiliated with the GSBS Programs in Medical Physics and Quantitative Sciences, and is a professor at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth’s Institute of Molecular Medicine.

Cassian Yee, M.D., was awarded $2,399,991 for his project, Immunotherapeutic targeting of SLC45A2 for treatment of uveal melanoma. Yee is affiliated with the GSBS Programs in Cancer Biology and Immunology, and is a professor in the Departments of Melanoma Medical Oncology and Immunology at MD Anderson.

Since its inception, CPRIT has awarded 1,372 grants totaling more than $2.26 billion for cancer research. The agency began making awards in 2009 after Texas voters overwhelmingly approved a 2007 constitutional amendment committing $3 billion to the fight against cancer. Programs made possible with CPRIT funding have brought 159 distinguished researchers to Texas, advanced scientific and clinical knowledge, and provided more than 4.7 million life-saving education, training, prevention, and early detection services to Texans.

site var = gsbs